Avant Gardening

Avant Gardening & Landscaping

Archive: January 2017

Winter Daydream – Craftsman Small-Space Gardening

Sick of Wisconsin Winters yet? We decided that this week we are feeling the need to dream of summer.

Just pretend it’s a beautiful, warm July day… you’re out on your patio, sipping some lemonade, birds are chirping, flowers are nodding in the warm breeze…. How about we take you back to the 2015 Olbrich Botanical Garden’s Home Garden Tour?

For a little while, let’s forget about the cold and the snow… Let’s enjoy some lovely summer weather and look at a gorgeous garden.

garden design landscape madison middleton wisconsin  garden design landscape madison middleton wisconsin

Blazing Star (Liatris spicata) and Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) are both examples of native plant species in this bird & butterfly friendly landscape.

garden design landscape madison middleton wisconsin

Meandering natural flagstone stepper pathway entices visitors throughout the garden. A small rain garden with native plantings, catches grey-water from the roof and slowly infiltrates it back into the aquifer.

garden design wisconsin landscape sustainable arbor garden design wisconsin landscape sustainable arbor

This lovely arbor invites visitors to wander throughout the garden. A natural Chilton flagstone pathway provides an informal way to access the perennial garden beds and various intimate garden spaces.

garden design landscape wisconsin madisonFront entrance to this craftsman-style home. Natural stone and abundant plantings create an inviting landscape.

To see more images of this garden, check out our Houzz Project Profile: Craftsman Small-Space Gardening

 

Rough Wisconsin Landscape – Salt Tolerant Plants

Our climate can be crazy! From freezing rain to temperatures in the 40’s in January… it’s difficult to predict what it’s going to do next! With the recent freezing rain and the need to spread sand (and salt in most cases) we thought we’d share a list of plants that are salt tolerant.

Excess salt in the soil upsets a plant’s ability to move water and results in desiccation and, for some plants, eventually death. Aerial salt spray leaves particles on the leaves, stems, and buds and when the water evaporates causes plant disfigurement and/or death.

Wisconsin landscape winter salt tolerant plants Wisconsin landscape winter salt tolerant plants

Although no salt is good – these plants are usually tough enough to withstand it. Plants that evolved in the presence of high saline environments (think seaside) have tolerance to these environments.  When planning for areas with potential of high salt damage (near roads, driveways, and sidewalks) consider using some of the plants listed below that demonstrate these tolerances.

Salt Tolerant Plants

  1. Aesculus hippocastanum (Horsechestnut)
  2. Amelanchier spp. (Serviceberry)
  3. Aronia melanocarpa (Black Chokeberry)
  4. Celtis occidentalis (Hackberry)
  5. Chioanthus virginicus (White Fringetree)
  6. Ginkgo biloba (Ginkgo)
  7. Gleditsia triacanthos (Honeylocust)
  8. Gymnocladus dioicus (Kentucky Coffeetree)
  9. Ilex glabra (Inkberry)
  10. Ilex verticillata (Winterberry)
  11. Juniperus chinensis (Chinese Juniper)
  12. Juniperus communis (Common Juniper)
  13. Juniperus horizontalis (Creeping Juniper)
  14. Juniperus virginiana (Eastern Red Cedar)
  15. Larix decidua (Common Larch)
  16. Picea pungens (Colorado Spruce)
  17. Prunus serotina (Black Cherry)
  18. Quercus alba (White Oak)
  19. Quercus bicolor  (Swamp White Oak)
  20. Quercus macrocarpa (Bur Oak)
  21. Rhus typhina (Staghorn Sumac)
  22. Sambucus canadensis (Elderberry)
  23. Symphoricarpos albus (Snowberry)
  24. Syringa reticulata (Japanese Tree Lilac)
  25. Syringa vulgaris (Common Lilac)
  26. Taxodium distichum (Baldcypress)
  27. Ulmus americana ‘Valley Forge’ (American Elm)
  28. Viburnum dentatum (Arrowwood Viburnum)
  29. Viburnum prunifolium (Blackhaw Viburnum)
  30. Yucca filamentosa (Adam’s Needle)
  31. Yucca glauca (Soapweed)

 

5 Questions Worth Asking Your Potential Landscaper

Local trade shows and expos can be awkward and intimidating! Do you get anxious wandering through a huge exposition hall lined with booth after booth of unfamiliar companies… New expo visitors can be hesitant for numerous reasons. Do any of the following situations below apply to you?

  • Just bought a new house and have no idea where to start…
  • Feel like if you stop and talk you will be pressured into a hard sale…
  • Just not sure what/how to ask questions to get valuable information…

With the Madison Home Show fresh in our memory and the NARI Remodeling Expo coming up this weekend, we decided to create a list of intelligent and important questions for you to ask your local landscaper before you hire them to work at your property.

These questions are not only important to make sure you will be working with a qualified, reputable landscaping company – but will also get the conversation going about your potential project and help you determine if they are the right company for you!

Here are 5 Questions we’d recommend asking – with answers from Tim Stenzel, one of our Landscape Architects at Avant Gardening & Landscaping.

1. What is your background in the field?

I have a Bachelor’s degree in Conservation Biology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a Master’s degree in Landscape Architecture from SUNY-ESF in Syracuse, NY. After graduate school, I spent several years working in and around Chicago and the North Shore communities.

2. How long has your company been in business?

We are proud to be celebrating our 32nd Year in Business! As our name implies, Avant Gardening and Landscaping has been at the forefront of the gardening and landscaping industry in Madison and Dane County since 1985. We couldn’t do it without our loyal clients and dedicated team.

3. Do you hire Registered Landscape Architects?

Yes! Having a registered landscape architect on staff is very important for the health, safety and welfare of our clients. We have 3 Licensed Landscape Architects, which is quite a few for our small office! Liza Lightfoot, Dan Schmitt & Tim Stenzel are all very talented and have experience working on complicated projects. Read more about them on our staff page.

4. Where does the bulk of your work come from?

Most of our work comes from Loyal Existing Clients coming back to complete another phase of their project or continuing to work with our maintenance team in their gardens. A large majority of brand new clients come from Existing Client Referrals. We also receive quite a few referrals from local businesses and public gardens (such as Allen Centennial Garden and Olbrich Botanical Gardens), our website & Google, and the Wisconsin Public Television Garden Expo. 

If the company answers with Yellow Pages, or doesn’t know where their work comes from, this is a red flag… It tells you that the contractor is either new, inexperienced, a low-baller in the industry or simply doesn’t get many referrals…

5. What are the most unique services your company provides?

  • Avant offers a very successful organic lawn care program using compost topdressing, compost teas, and lawn aerating.
  • We use a lot of natural stone in our patio, wall and walkway installations. This is becoming less common in our industry. We use eco-sensitive practices whenever possible and believe in sourcing local raw materials, such as natural stone, which means there is less processing of materials which ultimately creates more waste water.
  • We make our own soil blends! We recycle whenever possible and take all of the plant debris from jobsites and turn it continually throughout the year, once it breaks down into fine organic matter we mix it into our planting bed mix – the outcome is a very fertile soil mix that is periodically tested by UW Soils lab to ensure high quality.

Bonus question!
6. What is your company’s philosophy?

Our philosophy has always been to see ourselves as stewards of the environment. We believe in living by example, Avant’s office grounds are landscaped in a naturalistic style that attracts a diversity of birds, pollinators and butterflies. We’ve recently become an official Monarch Waystation! We also have a small pond that we keep open and functioning through the long winter months because it is an important water source for wildlife.

We hope this blog posts helps you prepare for the next home show or expo you visit! Speaking of… don’t forget to visit us this weekend! Stop by Avant Gardening & Landscaping’s booth #409 at the NARI Madison Remodeling Expo Jan. 20-22. For more information check out http://www.nariexpo.com/

#RemodelWithNARI #NARIMadison #MadisonWI

Top 3 Wisconsin Landscape Plants Attractive All Year Long

Many Wisconsin gardeners believe four-season interest means they’re limited to evergreens, but there are many other options! The three plants listed below are top favorites because they have either unique berries, bark or other interesting element in the winter – and they’re not evergreens!

1. Seven-Son Flower (Heptacodium miconioides) has glossy leaves that emerge and remain attractive all season. Fragrant flowers bloom late in the season, followed by small fruits surrounded by a bright red/magenta calyx produces a late fall display. Light brown exfoliating bark adds winter interest.

Zone: 5 to 9     Height: 15-20 feet     Spread: 8-10 feet     Attracts: Hummingbirds

seven-son flower, heptacodium miconiodies, wisconsin landscape plantsseven-son flower, heptacodium miconiodies, wisconsin landscape plants

2. Vernal Witchhazel (Hamamelis vernalis) is an early-flowering shrub. The orange-red flowers have strap-like petals that curl inward on chilly days (an adaptive mechanism to protect from freezing). The oval-shaped leaves turn a golden yellow/orange in fall and often hang on through winter.

Zone: 4 to 8     Height: 6-10 feet     Spread: 8-15 feet      Tolerate: Deer, Erosion, Clay Soil

vernal witch hazel, hamamelis vernalis, wisconsin landscape plants

3. Black Chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa ‘Autumn Magic’) exhibits white flower clusters in spring and dark green leaves through summer. The astringent berries contain about 3X MORE ANTIOXIDANTS than blueberries! Excellent fall color ranges from bright orange to reddish-purple. Fruit clusters persist into January.

Zone: 3 to 8     Height: 3-6 feet     Spread: 4-7 feet     Suggested Use: Natural, Rain Garden

black chokeberry, aronia melanocarpa 'autumn magic', wisconsin landscape plants

 

Why is Dormant Pruning Important? Expert Tree & Shrub Trimming

Do you have a large Dogwood, Viburnum or other suckering plant that is outgrowing its space? Dormant pruning maybe your solution!

What is dormant pruning?  

Well what does “dormant” mean exactly… with regards to a plant or bud, “dormant” means: alive but not actively growing. Think of it like a hibernation period for plants, their normal functions are suspended or slowed down in the winter time.

Dormant pruning is strategic pruning (or trimming) that is done during a plant’s dormancy period – winter or early spring, before the buds break. The plant is pruned aggressively, reducing its overall size by thinning out the canes, removing dead, diseased and crossing branches.

tree trimming madison wisconsin landscape maintenance

BEFORE – overgrown & crossing branches

tree trimming madison wisconsin landscape maintenance

AFTER – thinned, increased overall health

Why is dormant pruning important?

Dormant pruning is a great practice to increase the overall health of your landscape. Pruning in general helps you control the size of a plant, growth pattern, and helps rejuvenate old overgrown plants.

Although the snow and bitterly cold wind chills might make you just want to hibernate as well… dormant pruning is typically the best time to prune plants. You are able to see the overall branch structure more easily, and the insects and disease-causing organisms are not active during this time of year.

What about trimming large trees?

Mature trees are especially important to ONLY dormant prune to prevent the spread of diseases. Various insects and diseases are attracted to fresh, open ‘bleeding’ cuts on trees. One prime example is with Oak trees. They should only be pruned after October 15th, but if possible it is best if they are dormant pruned when the picnic beetle is definitely not active. Oak Wilt is caused by the fungus Ceratocystis fagacearum. Picnic beetles are attracted to mats of the oak wilt fungus in infected trees, they pick up spores of the fungus on their bodies, and then carry the spores to healthy trees. The beetles are attracted to trees that have been recently wounded poorly timed pruning, and sometimes wind or storm damage.

What cannot be dormant pruned?

Evergreens, however, do not respond well to this type of pruning. Generally evergreens require very little pruning, especially since they are slower growing, but if necessary this should be done later in the spring or summer.

 

Your Wisconsin Landscape & Garden Checklist – January

“The wise gardener anticipates June in January.”  ~Author Unknown

Most of us in Madison, Wisconsin have already gone into hibernation – the below zero landscape outside and frigid wind chills make us cozy up inside and dream of spring (only venturing out if absolutely necessary!) But there are still plenty of things to keep us gardeners busy!

1. Take Down Your Holiday Tree

This is a task always dreaded in my family – but why not make it a positive experience by recycling it in your garden? Place your dried-out tree next to bird feeders and your feathery friends are sure to appreciate the added shelter and cover.

2. Appreciate Winter Landscape Beauty

You don’t even need to go outside for this one! Just by gazing out your window you can enjoy the twinkle of a fresh snowfall, finely textured plants frozen into lace, and seed heads with snowy caps. Ornamental Grasses (especially Panicum), Echinacea, Echinops, Liatris and Rudbeckia all provide great winter interest.Landscaping Madison Wisconsin Winter Landscape Seed Heads

3. Water The Flowers Birds!

Bird watching can really help Wisconsin gardeners make it through the long winter season. Consider investing in a heated birdbath, even more so than food, birds need clean, open water for bathing and drinking. Now these birdbaths can even be solar powered!

Wisconsin Winter Landscape, Madison, Wisconsin, Landscape Water Gardens

To keep water open in your garden pond, add an aerator and heater. Birds will appreciate you!

4. Evaluate Your Garden’s “Bones”

The monochromatic setting can help you see the structure of your garden. Now is a good time to take notes and sketch on photographs of your landscape, think about where additional evergreens could be sited or how pretty an arbor and bench might be – perhaps some outdoor lighting accents to make the long nights less dark and depressing!

5. Take a Trip!

If you can’t escape to a tropical paradise, think about visiting a local substitute! Check out a conservatory like the Bolz Conservatory at Olbrich Botanical Gardens – a stroll through the warm, moist air on a sunny day is sure to make you forget about the inches of snow just on the other side of the glass! For more information: http://olbrich.org/gardens/conservatory.cfm